Posts Tagged ‘strengths’

Why Great Leaders Are Amplifiers

February 6th, 2018

‘Amplifiers are the rare and extraordinary leaders who amplify the best in themselves and others. They amplify the messages that matter, amplify the positive mood in a culture and amplify the results achieved.’

– Matt Church

In a world that seems to feed off of negativity, drama and hype our ability to amplify the positive stories, opportunities and results around us has never been so important. Unfortunately for many, living and working in environments that predominately focus and feed on the failures and barriers that get in the way of success is all too familiar. The reality though is that there are many extraordinary events happening, results being produced and opportunities arising every day. We just need help in seeing and hearing about them – especially with the pace and diversity at which we have now become accustomed to operating in.

Great leaders know this. Not only do they recognize their occurrence but they proactively seek to highlight them and in doing so have a significant impact on those around them and their outcomes. Great leaders are like amplifiers who know how to effectively increase the volume and quality of sound whilst minimizing distortion and unwanted feedback.  They amplify the highest of qualities and eliminate the distractions and unwanted noise.

Leaders who can help others recognize this, be it for themselves, their teams or their customers and clients are invaluable. People feel more energized by their presence and more confident that success can be achieved with the right focus. They are driven to put their best foot forward and be a part of the ‘extraordinary’. Just as success creates success so to does the habit of belief that extraordinary results are possible.

To build high performance, we as leaders we need to ensure that our focus is on amplifying the individual strengths, extraordinary results and constructive behaviours that contribute to ongoing success. To do this we need to make sure we are attracting and employing the right people for our organisations and teams; that we are creating workplace cultures that recognise individual contributions and reward healthy positive behaviours (and importantly remove that are not); and that we give people the freedom to operate from a place of strength.

However as Jon Stewart so aptly notes ‘if we amplify everything, we hear nothing’. As such we need to learn to be discerning about what constitutes the ‘extraordinary and successful’. We also need to be brave enough to address the results and behaviours that detract us from achieving what we set out to do. Failing to do so results in a culture of ‘anything goes’ where the lines between success and status quo or healthy and unhealthy prevail.

As leaders I would encourage you to reflect on how you amplify the following 5 areas in order to build individual, team and organisational success:

  • Strengths: Tom Rath & Barrie Conchie, authors of Strength Based Leadership: Great Leaders, Teams and Why People Follow – conducted studies that revealed engagement increased eightfold when leaders focused on their employee’s strengths as well as their own increasing from 9% to 73%.
  • Behaviours: How we act and behave in our workplace is fundamental to success our individual and overall success. Invariably they are the ‘linchpin’ not only in our abilities to deliver but in the timeliness and quality the results produced.
  • Results: Recognising and applauding results – both incrementally and at the point of final delivery – is important in helping to define what ‘great’ looks like. Amplifying great results also helps drive engagement, energy and productivity.
  • Contributions: Often success is the ‘sum or parts’ where a number of individuals have played a role in supporting the overall delivery. Learning to acknowledge the contributions of others is fundamental to elevating healthy workplace performance.
  • Learning: Not everything we undertake is considered a success. How we embrace failure, recognise it and learn from it is fundamentally important to creating healthy environments that encourage us to step out of our comfort zone. It also supports our efforts to create new ways of working, innovate and problem solve.

As always I would love to hear your thoughts.

Margot

Why Great Leaders Are Amplifiers

July 19th, 2016

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“Amplifiers are the rare and extraordinary leaders who amplify the best in themselves and others. They amplify the messages that matter, amplify the positive mood in a culture and amplify the results achieved.” 
– Matt Church
In a world that seems to feed off of negativity, drama and hype our ability to amplify the ‘good news stories’ and positive opportunities around us has never been so important. Unfortunately for many, living and working in environments that predominately focus and feed on the failures, problems and barriers that get in the way of success is all too common. The reality though is that there are many extraordinary events happening, results being produced and acts of genuine kindness being delivered every day. We just need help in seeing and hearing about them – especially with the pace and diversity at which we have now become accustomed to operating at.

Great leaders know this. Not only do they recognize their occurrence but they proactively seek to highlight them and in doing so have a significant impact on those around them and their outcomes. Great leaders are like amplifiers who know how to effectively increase the volume and quality of sound whilst minimizing distortion and unwanted feedback.  They amplify the highest of qualities and eliminate the distractions and unwanted noise.

Leaders who can help others recognize this, be it for themselves, their teams or their customers and clients are invaluable. People feel more energized by their presence and more confident that success can be achieved with the right focus. They are driven to put their best foot forward and be a part of the ‘extraordinary’. Just as success creates success so to does the habit of belief that extraordinary results are possible.

Interestingly our minds seem to work a lot like amplifiers– whatever we choose to listen to and focus on, the more enlarged the sound and impact seems to become in our mind. This is why it is so important to ensure that we focus our energy on amplifying the right things. Dwelling on the wrong things can set our career (and life) on a very different path or trajectory to the one that is possible if we choose to focus on the right things.

To build high performance, we as leaders need to ensure that we are focused on amplifying the individual strengths, extraordinary results and constructive behaviours that contribute to ongoing success. To do this we need to ensure that we are attracting and employing the right people for our organisations and teams; that we are creating workplace cultures that recognise individual contributions and reward healthy positive behaviours (and importantly remove that are not); and that we give people the freedom to operate from a place of strength.

However as Jon Stewart so aptly notes ‘if we amplify everything, we hear nothing’. As such we need to learn to be discerning about what constitutes the ‘extraordinary and successful’. We also need to be brave enough to address the results and behaviours that detract us from achieving what we set out to do. Failing to do so results in a culture of ‘anything goes’ where the lines between success and status quo or healthy and unhealthy prevail.

As leaders I would encourage you to reflect on how you amplify the following 5 areas in order to build individual, team and organisational success:

  • Strengths: Tom Rath & Barrie Conchie, authors of Strength Based Leadership: Great Leaders, Teams and Why People Follow – conducted studies that revealed engagement increased eightfold when leaders focused on their employee’s strengths as well as their own increasing from 9% to 73%.
  • Behaviours: How we act and behave in our workplace is fundamental to success – both our individual and overall team and organisational success. Invariably they are the ‘linchpin’ not only in our abilities to deliver but in the timeliness and quality the results produced.
  • Results: Recognising and applauding results – both incrementally and at the point of final delivery – is important in helping to define what ‘great’ looks like. Amplifying great results also helps drive engagement, energy and productivity.
  • Contributions: Often success is the ‘sum or parts’ where a number of individuals have played a role in supporting the overall delivery. Learning to acknowledge the contributions of others is fundamental to elevating healthy workplace performance.
  • Learning: Not everything we undertake is considered a success. How we embrace failure, recognise it and learn from it is fundamentally important to creating healthy environments that encourage us to step out of our comfort zone. It also supports our efforts to create new ways of working, innovate and problem solve.

As always I would love to hear your thoughts.

Margot Andersen

If you would like to explore ways to amplify your leadership capability or that of your team, please contact Margot on 0400 336 318.

Pride: Sin or Virtue?

September 29th, 2015

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“Every job is a self portrait of the person who did it. Autograph your work with excellence ”

– Jessica Guidobono
 Recently a friend and I found ourselves deep in conversation about some of the things she had been observing in her workplace. Whilst discussing some of her observations about individuals who worked with and for her she made the comment that it was clearly evident who took pride in what they did versus who didn’t. When talking about it further we were discussing how it seemed to be one of those ‘one percenters’ or distinguishing factors that set people apart. Regardless of what it was that they were doing, their sense of pride was apparent – evident in things such as presentation, commitment and communication in a genuine and warm manner.

It got me thinking about the concept of pride and whether or not it is something more than just ‘one of the seven deadly sins’ or a negative emotion as so many regard it to be. Taking pride in who we are, what we do and how we show up and engage every day can’t always be considered a bad thing can it?

There is no doubt that pride can in fact take a negative angle with damaging and limiting consequences both personally and professionally. Often closely aligned with arrogance and superiority, pride is not only potentially damaging to ourselves but also our businesses, customers, clients and the people we lead.

Most of us have been in situations where our pride has got the better of us or we have borne witness to it in others. Not speaking up or taking action for fear of sounding ill informed, being wrong or simply being judged. Not taking on new opportunities because they seem to be ‘beneath us’ or because we couldn’t bear the thought of not succeeding or exceeding. Seeing people refuse to admit to mistakes or acknowledge it with those around them. In each of these scenarios, pride is absolutely limiting potential, undermining self-confidence and leading us down a path of no reward. In short, this form of pride can sabotage our careers and us.

However when pride is not associated with fear or being superior to others but instead in who we are, what we do or what we are a part of, it can drive performance, influence, happiness and self-confidence. When pride stems from a place of feeling good about who we are, we are less likely to be associated with the negative behaviours and attitudes mentioned previously. We are likely to be more inclusive, more tolerant and focused on opening up the world of possibility rather than shutting it down.

Researchers have long debated whether or not pride is good or bad. Ultimately they agree there are two very divergent outcomes. On one hand pride in one’s self, successes and relationships promotes future positive behaviours and achievements whilst on the other hand it can very easily lead to a sense of narcissism, relationship conflict and hostility. One thing they do agree on is that pride occurs in response to internal beliefs and drivers. Tracy & Robbins noted in their article ‘The Nature of Pride’ that we are always operating on a sliding scale of pride and shame. Whilst this may seem extreme their observations led them to conclude that our everyday lives are ‘frequently infused with a sense of mastery and achievement or conversely frustration and failure and we react to these events with self-conscious emotions’.

I am sure if that if we were to stop and consider some of the workplaces we have operated in, we have seen evidence of both outcomes of pride – either in our self or in those around us. Whether it has been in the quality of work produced, the quality of engagement or in the way situations are approached. Learning to embrace the positive aspects of pride – without overconfidence – can and does influence our success.

I would encourage you to take a moment to consider how pride is shaping your career? You can start by asking yourself these 6 quick questions:

Are you proud of:

  1. Who you are and what your natural talents are?
  2. What you do?
  3. Your contribution and the difference that you are making?
  4. Who you work for and with?
  5. How you show up each day and present yourself?
  6. How you operate and in your professional reputation?

Taking pride in who we are, what we do and how we show up each day is critical if we are to maximise our opportunities and personal success and fulfillment. Ultimately pride is a bit like a superpower and it is up to us how we choose to use it: for the power of good or evil.

As always I would love to hear your thoughts below.

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Margot – The Career DiplomatIf you would like to explore ways to build confidence, clarity and choice in your career please contact Margot on 0400 336 318.

The Business Of You

December 2nd, 2014

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Our business in life is not to get ahead of others, but to get ahead of ourselves
– to break our own records to outstrip our yesterday by our today.

~ Stewart B Johnson 

[vcex_divider style=”solid” icon_color=”#000000″ icon_size=”14px” margin_top=”20px” margin_bottom=”20px”][vcex_spacing size=”10px”]Current employment trends have seen us bear witness to ever increasing job competition; rising unemployment figures; increased redundancies and company downsizing; low job security; and new technologies continuing to disrupt the way in which we do business.

‘Getting ahead’ on the career ladder and successfully navigating the volatility and ever-changing nature of the employment landscape is a challenge we all face. I recently heard a comment that obtaining career success requires individuals to consider themselves as entrepreneurs and their careers as a start up business. Reid Hoffman (Linked in Co-Founder) and Ben Casnocha wrote a book on this very topic, stating that the skills that start-ups require are the very skills that professionals need in order to advance their careers: nimbleness, personal investment, strong networks and intelligent risk taking.

Building these skills into your career requires a high degree of self-awareness, confidence and foresight: it requires a well-executed plan. Without one it is all too easy to become caught in the whirlpool of uncertainty, change and fierce competition.

So why are so many of us not creating plans for our careers? For many it seems to be a case of the ‘rabbit in headlights’ scenario – not knowing what we want, not knowing how to effectively develop or implement a personal plan, and not having the time. If you are to accelerate your career or stand out in the market place, there is no denying that you need a robust and adaptable plan. Creating one that offers you clear direction, practical building blocks, and builds resilience, is critical if you are to achieve personal fulfillment and career success.

Consider how you can apply these following seven strategies to help you future proof and accelerate your career today:[vc_single_image image=”433″ border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_blank” alignment=”none” link=”http://talentinsight.com.au/private-coaching/”]

Be ready for change: It is estimated that over 65% of today’s children are currently being educated for jobs that don’t yet exist (Cathy Davidson – Futures specialist). The ability to develop and adapt your personal career plans as you change, as our social environments change, and industries and business protocols change is critical if you are to maintain relevance and protect your career.

Invest in your strengths: To build your competitive advantage you need to not only know your strengths but how best to build upon them, where to apply them and where they are most valued.

Never Stop Learning: Never assume that you know all there is to know about managing your career – even transitioning out of a full time career takes planning and foresight. Begin by investing time to acquire the right intelligence and know-how that will accelerate your career. Investigate key industry trends and challenges; recent business success stories; know who the key influencers and thought leaders are. Be proactive in educating yourself in what is required from both an industry and individual perspective.

Invest in a career coach or mentor: Building and maintaining career momentum can be difficult. It is all too easy to get caught up in the business of doing and for many the career management process becomes a stop start process. A career coach can provide clarity of direction, consistency of focus and provide new tools and perspectives to elevate performance and productivity.

Strengthen your professional network: Invest in the right relationships and dedicate time and energy to them. Identify your key influencers and thought leaders, and identify a meaningful pathway of how to approach and engage with them. Build a networking plan that fosters authentic professional relationships where you can also offer valuable contributions.

Take intelligent risks: Low risk is often associated with stability. However it has been suggested that in the long term, continually opting for the low risk options leads to increased vulnerability as it reduces our resilience to deal with sudden and high level change. ‘Playing it safe’ with your career can in fact create higher risk through an inability to cope with the volatility and rate of change which is all to common in the market place today.

Create balance: When we create balance we create strength. Healthy relationships and interests outside of work help not bring a strong sense of calm, being grounded, resilience and motivation. You can contribute to the success of your career by building balance and dedicating time and attention to your family and personal life.

In the words of Mark Twain… the secret to getting ahead is getting started. The secret to getting started is knowing your career purpose, breaking down your larger goals into manageable, realistic tasks and simply starting on the first one.

What are you starting on next to advance your career for 2015?[vcex_divider style=”solid” icon_color=”#000000″ icon_size=”14px” margin_top=”20px” margin_bottom=”20px”][vc_single_image image=”126″ border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_self” alignment=”none”]If you would like to discuss ways to advance your career and capability in 2015, please contact Margot directly on margot@talentinsight.com.au or +61 3 9866 3842.[vcex_divider style=”solid” icon_color=”#000000″ icon_size=”14px” margin_top=”20px” margin_bottom=”20px”][vc_single_image image=”88″ border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_blank” alignment=”none” link=”http://talentinsight.us3.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=961a17dac8287c94458c7983d&id=f81e0aac65″]

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