Archive for February, 2020

The Keys Of Consistency

February 5th, 2020

“It’s not what we do once in a while that shapes our lives. It’s what we do consistently” – Tony Robbins

We all know that true success does not occur overnight. Behind it sits volumes of effort, belief and action demonstrated consistently over time. Underpinning much of our success has been the small daily or weekly decisions and actions and how they have added up over the years.

With a new year well underway, we need to ask ourselves how our actions are stacking up against the intentions, resolutions and goals we have set for ourselves.

Whether it has been a commitment to read recent industry publications to help us remain relevant; invested time in creating purposeful professional relationships and broad networks; or made a conscious effort to expand and diversify our skill sets, the consistency of our actions (or lack thereof) has played a major role in where we find ourselves today.

When advising business leaders, I often think of a Harvard Business Review study that coined the term, the ‘Progress Principle’. It reminds us: “Of all the things that can boost emotions, motivation, and perceptions during a workday, the single most important is making progress in meaningful work,”

Building awareness around what needs to be done is only the first step. We must execute our ideas and ambitions – which is often easier said than done.

However, at time where our ability to navigate change and demonstrate true career resiliency, never have these ‘little things’ counted for so much. These small actions over time compound positively or negatively much like they do in a bank account. Lots of small proactive decisions add up in a positive way like regular savings into a bank account; whereas complacency and bad decisions are like small debits eating away at your value over time.

A tool I frequently draw on in my training programs is my career currency model, which prompts us to regularly ask ourselves the following:

  • Where are you at and why?
  • What are your most pressing considerations?
  • What can be done to enact immediate action?
  • How do you maximise existing career options?
  • What are the longer-term implications or possible outcomes?

Ultimately, these questions will help you to determine what actions you are taking to grow the value of your career currency today.

In talking with business leaders, I often hear that it is not the big things that keep them awake at night but the little things. Why? Because they know that over time these little ‘things’ have the power to become the big things and significantly impact efficiencies, outcomes and relationships. It is exactly the same with our careers – if we aren’t careful, failure to action the ‘little’ things will prevent us from reaching our potential and desired levels of success.

As leaders, our ability to demonstrate and build consistency in performance, behaviour and service is imperative. Nothing is more frustrating than inconsistency in one or more of these three elements. No doubt many of us are able to recall colleagues who have severely limited their opportunities due to an inability to consistently perform or behave. Where one week they seem to be producing record results only to not contribute for the following three. Or where they are technically brilliant at what they do but cause so much disruption amongst their team that the overall results are compromised because no one wants to work with them or you going forward.

There is no doubt that one of the biggest causes of failure today is inconsistency. Whilst the idea of consistency is fairly simple the ability to execute it is often not. More often than not it is due to one of the following three things:

  1. Impatience: We want the results immediately. Think of all those diet and exercise regimes that we have all invariably embarked upon!
  2. Belief: If we don’t believe in what we are doing the only thing that we are most likely to be consistent in is avoidance.
  3. Value: Failure to see the benefits of the amount of effort invested.

Consistency is definitely achievable for us all but it does take practice. Understanding what it is that you do and why is critical but so too is understanding how consistency creates high value and longevity in your career. I would encourage you to take a moment to consider the following career benefits:

  • Consistency establishes belief: The thoughts and actions that we take on a daily and/or regular basis do shape our own self-belief and the belief that others have in us. Not only is it a powerful force for motivating and building trust in others but it also serves as a powerful model for the standards we and others rise and fall to.
  • Consistency creates relevance: Your customers, clients, organisations and team members are all looking to you as a reliable and informed source of information. To remain informed we need to be relevant. What are the latest developments in your industries, your areas of expertise or your regions? Is your level of knowledge and it’s applicability empowering or depowering you and what you do?
  • Consistency allows for measurement: To build meaningful and successful steps of progression we need to understand what it is that is actually working – or not working. What are the results of your consistent efforts, actions and strategies – good or bad? Our ability to measure, assess and realign are crucial skills in our ever-changing world.
  • Consistency creates accountability: Accountability is a critical requirement in high performance and values aligned cultures. Owning what you do, the ‘why’ and the way you do it can’t help but create accountability for both yourself and those around you. Being consistently accountable – in the good and the bad times – is what will set you apart as the consummate professional.
  • Consistency builds stability: Not only does it build stability but it also builds sustainability. When people know what you stand for and where they stand with you, it provides the framework for them to perform at their optimal level. By removing the game playing, the contradictions and the inconsistencies, individuals have a clear runway to success that engenders both confidence and loyalty.
  • Consistency establishes your reputation: Your track record is your reputation. Building that track record on one that is defined by consistent performance, respectful behaviours and high value relationships is fundamental to both your current and future success. Remember your track record follows you no matter where you go.

The future is all yours for the taking. What it is that you do consistency in your daily, weekly, monthly routine and ask yourself if it is building or limiting your career future?

As always I would love to hear your thoughts.

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